Monday, April 14, 2014

Your Taste In Art Says More Than You Imagine. . .

Press Secretary Jay Carney had a puff piece in the Washingtonian magazine, complete with pictures. Pictures, it seems that may have revealed more than the words of the article itself.  You judge.

Read the article here.  It is indeed a balancing act to claim the name American, to wear the badge of the Democratic Party, to work for President Obama, and have a deep affection for old Soviet era posters lauding communism.  So here are Carney's family and the artwork appreciated by the family.



















Now you know why art and architecture are so important -- they reflect our values as well as direct them.  In the Church art and architecture are not neutral but either for or against the faith.

3 comments:

Unknown said...

“It is indeed a balancing act to claim the name American, to wear the badge of the Democratic Party, to work for President Obama, and have a deep affection for old Soviet era posters lauding communism.” Am I correct in assuming that if it weren’t for that “deep affection for old Soviet posters lauding communism” these folds would be OK? Or does being a Democrat and working for President Obama also call into question whether one is an American?
All of that, of course, is in the context of how art affects what people think of you. When this is applied to church architecture, it becomes a problem, because there is no humor in church architecture; at least I don’t know of any. Those posters immediately identify one as being in sympathy with communism, right? And, of course, the President knowing that, chose this man to work for him. Oh, what wonderful intrigues you can weave from that. The late Jr. Senator from Wisconsin would jump with joy, list in hand.
The article states that both of the people worked in Moscow during the nineties – he for Time magazine, she for CNN. Anyone who knows what that means would know that they have no love for communism whatsoever. In fact, having spent time in Moscow, they would be strengthened in their dislike for it.
There was a shop on the Old Arbat in Moscow that sold Soviet memorabilia: posters, pictures, medals, uniforms and what have you. Many foreigners, including myself, went there and bought stuff as a joke. I still have a medal that says “Winner of socialist competition”. I have a photograph of myself next to a statue of Lenin, striking his pose. How can you tell that the posters in question “laud communism”? One says, “Comrade, You”, presumably an exhortation to use the familiar rather than the polite form of address. I cannot say what the other picture says. The first word is “Women”, but I cannot tell what follows.
So, although there is something to your theory that art affects how one is viewed, if one takes into account the possibility of humor, where it is appropriate, the problem becomes far less acute.
George A. Marquart

Anonymous said...

Unless I am mistaken, the balancing act referred to is the balance of one who presumes liberal politics but somehow has an affection for old soviet propaganda art, seemingly a contradiction in terms, no?

There was no accusation here. Perhaps the whole thing was a question raised for someone who works for a President who prefers acting on his own to passing legislation.

As far as art in the church, the point might be made that some see it as innocently as you see these posters -- what does it matter, a little humor, who can it hurt.

My 2 cents

Anonymous said...

Those posters signify Early Bolshevism, the Cheka and the mass torture and murder of Christians under the policy of Red Terror.